How susceptible are you to ‘neuromyths’? Take the quiz and test your science knowledge.

Melting brain
Neurons

Are your neurons firing correctly? Have you fallen for widely believed ‘neuromyths’?

Once you are given your score, please leave a comment (and your score, if you are brave enough!) in the box at the bottom of this page.

Good luck!

My blog next week will discuss this topic, with a more detailed look at recent research on the widely believed myths about  the brain.

Neuromyths

Congratulations - you have completed Neuromyths. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. You are %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Question 1
We use our brains 24h a day.
A
True
B
False
Question 2
Children must acquire their native language before a second language is learned. If they do not do so neither language will be fully acquired.
A
True
B
False
Question 3
Boys have bigger brains than girls.
A
True
B
False
Question 4
If pupils do not drink sufficient amounts of water (6–8 glasses a day) their brains shrink.
A
True
B
False
Question 5
It has been scientifically proven that fatty acid supplements (omega-3 and omega-6) have a positive affect on academic achievement.
A
True
B
False
Question 6
When a brain region is damaged other parts of the brain can take up its function.
A
True
B
False
Question 7
The left and right hemispheres of the brain always work together.
A
True
B
False
Question 8
Differences in hemispheric dominance (left brain, right brain) can help explain individual differences amongst learners.
A
True
B
False
Question 9
The brains of boys and girls develop at the same rate.
A
True
B
False
Question 10
Brain development has finished by the time children reach secondary school.
A
True
B
False
Question 11
There are critical periods in childhood after which certain things can no longer be learned.
A
True
B
False
Question 12
Information is stored in the brain in a network of cells distributed throughout the brain.
A
True
B
False
Question 13
Individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style (e.g. auditory, visual, kinesthetic).
A
True
B
False
Question 14
Learning occurs through modification of the brains’ neural connections.
A
True
B
False
Question 15
Academic achievement can be affected by skipping breakfast.
A
True
B
False
Question 16
Normal development of the human brain involves the birth and death of brain cells.
A
True
B
False
Question 17
Mental capacity is hereditary and cannot be changed by the environment or experience.
A
True
B
False
Question 18
Vigorous exercise can improve mental function.
A
True
B
False
Question 19
Environments that are rich in stimulus improve the brains of pre-school children.
A
True
B
False
Question 20
Children are less attentive after consuming sugary drinks and/or snacks.
A
True
B
False
Question 21
Circadian rhythms (“body-clock”) shift during adolescence, causing pupils to be tired during the first lessons of the school day.
A
True
B
False
Question 22
Regular drinking of caffeinated drinks reduces alertness.
A
True
B
False
Question 23
Exercises that rehearse co-ordination of motor-perception skills can improve literacy skills.
A
True
B
False
Question 24
Extended rehearsal of some mental processes can change the shape and structure of some parts of the brain.
A
True
B
False
Question 25
Individual learners show preferences for the mode in which they receive information (e.g. visual, auditory, kinesthetic).
A
True
B
False
Question 26
Learning problems associated with developmental differences in brain function cannot be remediated by education.
A
True
B
False
Question 27
Production of new connections in the brain can continue into old age.
A
True
B
False
Question 28
Short bouts of co-ordination exercises can improve integration of left and right hemispheric brain function.
A
True
B
False
Question 29
There are sensitive periods in childhood when it’s easier to learn things.
A
True
B
False
Question 30
When we sleep, the brain shuts down.
A
True
B
False
Question 31
We only use 10% of our brain.
A
True
B
False
Question 32
Learning is not due to the addition of new cells to the brain.
A
True
B
False
Once you are finished, click the button below. Any items you have not completed will be marked incorrect. Get Results
There are 32 questions to complete.

 

Acknowledgements

The neuromyths quiz was developed for a research study conducted by Sanne Dekker et al and published in Frontiers in Psychology in October 2012:

Sanne Dekker, Nikki C. Lee, Paul Howard-Jones, Jelle Jolles. Neuromyths in Education: Prevalence and Predictors of Misconceptions among Teachers. Front Psychol. 2012; 3: 429. Prepublished online 2012 August 31. Published online 2012 October 18. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00429

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Leah Tomlin

Leah Tomlin
Leah is Assistant Head of Henleaze Junior School in Bristol. She has over 10 years teaching experience, with a further 10 year background in scientific research. She has first hand experience of the challenges faced by teachers and school leaders who have poor access to the evidence, few skills to read and appraise research and little or no time to spend keeping up to date. Here's hoping this blog can help!

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